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Leading Business Organizations Submit BDCP Comment Letters Stating the Project is a Necessary Investment in the Future of California’s Economy

Friday, 25 July 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 25, 2014


Leading Business Organizations Submit BDCP Comment Letters Stating the Project is a Necessary Investment in the Future of California’s Economy 
BDCP Public Comment Period Concludes Next Week 

 

Sacramento, CA – The State Water Contractors, along with California’s business leaders, are reminding all Californians that the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) public comment period will come to a close on July 29, 2014, and the time to comment is now. California’s business leaders and organizations – including California Building Industry Association, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, Valley Industry and Commerce Association, Los Angeles County Business Federation, Los Angeles Business Council, and Orange County Business Council, among others – have joined in support of the BDCP. Many have already submitted comment letters stressing that the plan is a necessary investment in protecting our economy because a secure water supply is vital to the state’s economic well-being.

“Securing water supply reliability is one of California’s most challenging public policy issues, and the Bay Delta Conservation Plan will lead statewide policy in the direction of resolving that issue,” said Bryan Starr, senior vice president of the Orange County Business Council. “Moving forward with a plan that will secure long-term water supply reliability will show businesses that operate in the state and those who desire to relocate here that California invests in the infrastructure necessary to allow business growth and job creation.”

The water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) – which supplies 26 million Californians, the majority of the state’s businesses and millions of acres of farmland – is currently ushered through 100-year old dirt levees that could collapse in the event of a major earthquake. If an earthquake causes the current levees to fail, it would allow saltwater to contaminate this vital water source, cutting off the water supply that fuels two-thirds of the state for up to one year. To prevent this crisis, the BDCP will modernize the water delivery system in the Delta and offer long-term protection from earthquakes and other natural disasters by building two tunnels that will safely route water underneath, instead of through, the fragile Delta.

“Water is a primary ingredient in a building’s foundation just as it is for the foundation of our economy. Losing two-thirds of the state’s water supply would bring our industry to a standstill and is simply too great a risk to ignore,” said Dave Cogdill, president and CEO of the California Building Industry Association. “On behalf of the California Building Industry Association and the hundreds of thousands of business leaders and employees that we represent, we cannot afford to wait for crisis to strike. California needs the Bay Delta Conservation Plan.”

A secure water supply is an indispensable component of a healthy economy, yet it is a component that California currently lacks. Losing two-thirds of the state’s water supply would be bad for business and bad for the entire economy in California and beyond. The state’s business leaders believe that the BDCP is a necessary investment in protecting the future of California and creating a more business-friendly environment in the state. Additionally, studies show that the BDCP will create and protect more than 1 million jobs (BDCP Job Creation & Protection infographic). 

“Many of California’s core economic sectors, such as entertainment, tourism, manufacturing, technology, farming and hospitality, are dependent on a reliable and affordable water supply,” said Gary Toebben, president and CEO of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. “Water helps fuel California’s $2 trillion economy, and achieving improved water reliability, as outlined in the BDCP, is critical to the future of the state.”

The State Water Contractors and California’s business leaders are encouraging their local elected officials and community members to review and comment on the Draft BDCP and associated Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement before the public comment period concludes on July 29, 2014. 

For more information about the BDCP, please visit http://baydeltaconservationplan.com/Home.aspx.

For more information on how to submit a comment letter on the BDCP, please visit http://baydeltaconservationplan.com/PublicReview/HowtoComment.aspx.

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State Water Board Approves Regulations to Address Drought, Supports Conservation Efforts

Tuesday, 15 July 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 15, 2014


State Water Board Approves Regulations to Address Drought, Supports Conservation Efforts

Sacramento, CA – The State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) today approved emergency water conservation regulations to address the ongoing drought. Governor Jerry Brown issued an emergency drought declaration earlier this year and as the year progressed the drought has continued. As it currently stands, nearly 80 percent of California is facing “extreme drought” according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. The emergency regulations approved by the State Water Board call for implementation of a number of conservation measures to aid all Californians in saving water. 

Below is a statement on the regulations from State Water Contractors General Manager Terry Erlewine:   

“During this ongoing drought, conservation is vitally important and we support efforts that will help Californians save water. Water agencies throughout the state have already made significant strides in conservation over the past two decades, investing heavily in water use efficiency projects such as rebate programs, landscape irrigation technologies and much more that have helped move the dial on water savings statewide. However, Californians should take the state regulations as an urgent call to save water and water agencies will be working with their customers to be as efficient with water as possible.” 

More information related to the State Water Board’s emergency regulations will be available within the coming days.

To learn more about conservation programs and ideas, please visit www.saveourh2o.org. 

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Letters from Labor Groups Express Support for Bay Delta Conservation Plan

Monday, 14 July 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 14, 2014

Letters from Labor Groups Express Support for Bay Delta Conservation Plan 
Leaders Say Project is Vital to State Economy and Employment 

 

Sacramento, CA – Across the state, many of California’s local government, business, and agricultural organizations have joined the ongoing discussion about the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP). Several leading labor organizations – including the Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters, the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council, the Southern California District Council of Laborers and the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) Local 12 – have also weighed in and sent letters to their elected officials expressing support for the project.  

“We are writing today to express our support for the Bay Delta Conservation Plan and its goal of protecting the water supply that serves 26 million Californians, businesses and 3 million acres of farmland in California,” said Armando Esparza on behalf of the Southern California District Council of Laborers in a recent letter to the Los Angeles City Council. “This water supply is essential to Los Angeles and the entire state, fueling jobs and our economy.”

Losing this primary supply could have devastating impacts on our economy. A secure water source is vital to protecting the economic vitality of our state, and studies show that the BDCP will create and protect more than 1 million jobs (BDCP Job Creation & Protection infographic). 

The water from the Delta is currently ushered through 100-year-old dirt levees that could collapse in the event of a major earthquake. To address this crisis, a team of water experts, scientists and engineers developed the BDCP, which will modernize the water delivery system in the Delta and offer long-term protection from earthquakes and other natural disasters by building two tunnels that will safely route water underneath, instead of through, the fragile Delta. 

If an earthquake causes the current levees to fail, it would allow saltwater to contaminate this vital water source. Once this occurs, the water supply that fuels two-thirds of the state could be cut off for up to one year. California’s labor leaders fear that without the BDCP, the state’s economy could be vulnerable to the same fate as our water supply.

“This dramatic loss of water would bring our livelihoods to a standstill, since every construction permit requires a reliable source of water,” wrote Ron Miller on behalf of the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council. “In addition, the effects on health and quality of life would be devastating.”

Labor organizations are encouraging their local elected officials and community members to review and comment on the Draft BDCP and associated Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement. The public comment period concludes on July 29, 2014. 

For more information about the BDCP, please visit http://baydeltaconservationplan.com/Home.aspx.

For more information on how to submit a comment letter on the BDCP, please visit http://baydeltaconservationplan.com/PublicReview/HowtoComment.aspx.

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Release of Draft Implementing Agreement Major Milestone in BDCP Process

Friday, 30 May 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 30, 2014 

 

Release of Draft Implementing Agreement Major Milestone in BDCP Process 

Sacramento, CAThe California Natural Resources Agency today publicly released the draft of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) Implementing Agreement (IA). The draft IA lays out the responsibilities and commitments between the public water agencies and the relevant state and federal agencies in support of the BDCP’s coequal goals of creating a reliable water supply for the state and restoring the ecosystem of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta). The BDCP has been designed by state and federal agencies, in concert with experts and stakeholders, to meet these coequal goals and protect the water supplies for two-thirds of California. BDCP will construct two tunnels that will move some public water supplies underneath, instead of through, the fragile Delta. Currently, 100-year-old dirt levees in the Delta are ushering these critical water supplies through and they are vulnerable to collapse in the event of a major earthquake. The draft IA released today moves the BDCP process along, but as it is a draft, it is scheduled for a 60-day public review period.

Below is a statement on the release of the draft IA from State Water Contractors General Manager Terry Erlewine:   

“Public water agencies have worked diligently with state and federal agencies to ensure that there is a clear path for how the Bay Delta Conservation Plan would be executed. Implementing such a significant project requires thoughtful consideration and challenging decisions on a host of issues. The agreement announced today represents considerable work and a major milestone in this process. The commitments made here will enable us to move forward, working in the best interests of the millions of people, businesses and farms that would benefit from the reliable water supplies this project would provide.”

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State Water Project Allocation Raised to Five Percent

Friday, 18 April 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 18, 2014

 

State Water Project Allocation Raised to Five Percent
Increase Will Provide Limited Supplies to Water Agencies

 

Sacramento, CA – The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) announced today that the allocation for State Water Project (SWP) supplies will be increased from zero to five percent, though water agencies will not be able to access these supplies until after September. The previous zero percent allocation was the first time in the history of the SWP that such an allocation was announced. While a five percent allocation remains historically low and a slim fraction of the water deliveries that SWP contactors pay for in full, the increase is welcomed. Twenty-five million people and 750,000 acres of farmland depend on the SWP for a significant portion of their water supplies. The additional water allocations announced today will provide increased flexibility for SWP contractors and improve local water management efforts. 

Below is a statement on the increased allocation from State Water Contractors General Manager Terry Erlewine:   

“As water agencies continue to struggle with managing historically low water supplies, today’s increased allocation will help temper some of the most severe impacts of the drought. This additional water only amounts to the bare minimum of what is needed to ensure the most at-risk districts don’t run out of water and gives all agencies some increased flexibility for water management. While good news in the short term, the water supply outlook remains bleak and water agencies will continue to take steps to mitigate against the ongoing impacts of the drought.”  

For more information on the SWP water allocation and the drought, please visit www.water.ca.gov.

To learn more about conservation programs and ideas, please visit www.saveourh2o.org.

For more information about the BDCP, please visit www.baydeltaconservationplan.com. 

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Snow Survey Leaves California’s Water Supply Lacking

Tuesday, 01 April 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 1, 2014

 

Snow Survey Leaves California’s Water Supply Lacking 
Recent Storms Won’t Fend off Ongoing Drought, Water Agencies Don’t Anticipate Increased Allocation   

 

Sacramento, CA – The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) conducted one of the last snow surveys of the year today and, despite recent storms, the state’s water supply outlook remains dire. The survey determined that water content in the state’s snowpack is just 32 percent of average for this time of year. 

Throughout the winter months, the state measures how much water content is in Sierra Nevada snowpack, giving water managers a predictor of how much water they can anticipate flowing into the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, and then to homes, businesses and farms. This winter, snow was barely present, leading to an unprecedented allocation of zero percent for State Water Project (SWP) contractors. This means the 26 million people and 750,000 acres of farmland that depend on the SWP for a significant portion of their water supplies will likely go without it in 2014. Further straining the situation, public water agencies must continue to pay for a full allocation of water—amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars—even though they may not receive any actual deliveries.

“Even a March miracle would not have lifted California out of this drought. Water agencies across the state will be faced with finishing out this year, including the upcoming summer, without much needed State Water Project supplies,” said Terry Erlewine, general manager of the State Water Contractors. “Conservation efforts have been significant, but won’t be enough to protect water agencies and their customers from the impacts of losing such a major portion of their water supplies.” 

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Split Appeals Court Decision a Step Backwards for California Water Users

Thursday, 13 March 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                    
March 13, 2014

 

Split Appeals Court Decision a Step Backwards for California Water Users
Requirements Allowing Arbitrary Regulations on Water Operations to Stand  

Sacramento, CA – The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit today, in a split decision, reversed a 2011 ruling that overturned unnecessary regulations and protected California water users. In 2011, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California ruled in favor of public water agencies and in support of sound science, overturning what the court deemed to be arbitrary and harmful federal regulations on State Water Project operations. The set of regulations, known as a biological opinion, was put in place in an effort to revive Delta smelt populations, but to date has not done so. The restrictions have however triggered major water supply cuts over the years. The decision today by the Ninth Circuit will bring back these tight restrictions on water supplies and further exacerbate California’s ongoing water supply crisis.  

One aspect of the District Court decision was upheld, one which requires the United States Bureau of Reclamation to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act and complete an Environmental Impact Statement, including analysis of impacts on people and the economy before agreeing to implement the biological opinion. This is of particular importance to all areas of California that rely upon water from the State Water Project and have been hit hard by significant cutbacks in water supplies.  

As even the majority opinion issued by the Ninth Circuit recognizes, the Delta smelt biological opinion is a “jumble of disjointed facts and analyses,” and “a ponderous, chaotic document, overwhelming in size, and without the kinds of signposts and roadmaps that even trained, intelligent readers need in order to follow the agency’s reasoning.” The State Water Contractors agree with this assessment and believe the hundreds of thousands of acres of farms and 26 million people who receive water from the State Water Project deserve better. SWC also believes this underscores the need to work collaboratively using the best available science to address species and ecosystems as a whole, rather than to regulate our critically important infrastructure on a species-by-species basis. This is the goal of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan. 

“Today’s decision will make it more difficult for water agencies to recover from the present drought by preventing us from capturing and storing excess water when it is available in wet years. Without the flexibility to capture and store water during those years, we are left with less water and fewer options when we face unprecedented drought conditions like those we’re experiencing today. The ruling today, and the regulations it brings back, underscore the need for a comprehensive solution in the Delta. Addressing each species on a case-by-case basis like this has no benefit to the fish and only results in the development of arbitrary regulations and less water for families, businesses and farms,” said Terry Erlewine, general manager of the State Water Contractors.   

Notably, in a dissenting opinion, Judge Morris Arnold concurred with the District Court’s previous conclusions that the biological opinion was arbitrary and capricious and failed to rely upon the best available science.  In so finding, Judge Arnold would have upheld the admission of limited expert testimony that was excluded by the majority opinion. 
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State Leaders Announce Drought Relief Aid

Wednesday, 19 February 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                    
February 19, 2014

 

State Leaders Announce Drought Relief Aid
Hundreds of Millions of Dollars to be spent to Alleviate Drought Impacts

Sacramento, CA Governor Jerry Brown, alongside Senate President pro Tem Darrel Steinberg and Assembly Speaker John Perez, announced legislation that will funnel $687.4 million to efforts to alleviate the impacts of the current drought and ongoing record-breaking dry conditions. This announcement comes on the heels of a visit from President Barack Obama, who was recently in Fresno to discuss the drought and highlight federal assistance for the state during the drought emergency. The legislation announced today includes funding for drought preparedness and response efforts, securing emergency drinking water supplies, creating water efficiency projects, emergency food and shelter for people who are unable to work due to fallowed farmland, among numerous other critical efforts that will help to ensure Californians continue to have safe and reliable water available. The funding for these projects comes from various sources, including money from Proposition 84. Many of these efforts are being expedited to ensure that the funding can reach the hardest hit communities as soon as possible. Below is a statement on the emergency drought legislation from State Water Contractors General Manager Terry Erlewine:   

“We applaud the Governor and state leadership on the efforts announced today to help mitigate impacts the drought is causing statewide. Public water agencies are working hard to carefully manage water supplies and encourage conservation, but we all can and must do more. This additional funding for local supply projects will be crucial in efforts to continue providing safe and reliable water to communities across California during this unprecedented drought. Looking forward, these local efforts must be coupled with increased reliability of our statewide water supply – in preparing for the future it is crucial that we secure all water supplies, both local and imported.”  

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State Water Project Projected Allocation is Zero Percent for First Time in California History

Friday, 31 January 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 31, 2014

 

State Water Project Projected Allocation is Zero Percent for First Time in California History

Water Agencies Facing “Worst-Ever Water Supply Outlook”  

Sacramento, CA – The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) announced today that for the first time in the history of the State Water Project (SWP), water agencies should expect a zero percent allocation of SWP water supplies due to record dry conditions and low storage levels. While the forecast may change, water agencies throughout the state are preparing for the possibility of getting no water from a critical source and what DWR has called the “worst-ever water supply outlook.” Twenty-five million people and 750,000 acres of farmland depend on the SWP for a significant portion of their water supplies.

“For the first time in history, we are facing the real possibility of getting no water from the State Water Project—it’s a very serious situation,” said Terry Erlewine, general manager of the State Water Contractors. “Each of our water agencies will handle the drought differently depending on their circumstances, but across the board water districts are ramping up conservation and efficiency efforts to go beyond the conservation achievements already made.”

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Governor Brown Declares Drought in California

Friday, 17 January 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

January 17, 2014

Governor Brown Declares Drought in California 
Water Agencies Brace for Third Dry Year, Urge Californians to Conserve  

Sacramento, CA – Governor Jerry Brown issued a drought declaration today, an action that formalizes the severity of ongoing, record-breaking dry conditions. 2013 was recorded as the driest year in California’s history, and water levels in all of the state’s major reservoirs are below historical averages. San Luis Reservoir, for example, is at just 31 percent of capacity. 

These conditions have resulted in many water agencies, cities and counties across the state issuing mandatory and voluntary water conservation measures. The drought heightens the importance of amplifying conservation, increasing local water supply development efforts and modernizing statewide water infrastructure. In Governor Brown’s declaration, he calls on all Californians to reduce their water use by 20 percent. 

“The drought is official now, but we’ve been struggling with dry conditions for the past two years,” said Terry Erlewine, general manager of the State Water Contractors. “We support the Governor’s call to increase conservation and we encourage all Californians to reduce water use wherever and whenever possible. Public water agencies throughout the state are taking actions locally to conserve and manage limited supplies, but it’s imperative that we also modernize our statewide water delivery system so we can be better prepared for droughts.”

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California Finishes 2013 Driest Year on Record

Friday, 03 January 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 4, 2014

 

California Finishes 2013 Driest Year on Record 

Snow Survey Highlights Dry Conditions, Need to Address Water System & Conserve

Sacramento, CA – Today the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) conducted the first snow survey of 2014 and as expected, the findings were dismal. Following the end of 2013, which turned out to be the driest year on record, today’s survey determined that the water content in the snowpack is only roughly 20 percent.  

“Today’s snowpack measurements coupled with the already dismal allocation leaves California’s water agencies in a tough position,” said Terry Erlewine, general manager of the State Water Contractors. “We are seeing record-setting dry conditions across the state without end in sight. These conditions are worse than some of the most devastating droughts our state has ever seen.” 

Snowpack normally provides roughly one-third of the water used in California. Typically, the month of December brings a great deal of precipitation, providing snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains that melts over time and runs into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta; eventually serving 26 million Californians and 750,000 acres of farmland through the State Water Project (SWP). However, the month of December, like the rest of the year, saw very little rain across the state. 

Cities throughout California have shattered previous dry records, some examples of these record low precipitation levels (in inches) include: 

San Francisco: 2013 Record 5.59 / Previous Record 9.00 set in 1917  

Merced: 2013 Record 3.79 / Previous Record 6.00 set in 2007        

Paso Robles: 2013 Record 1.92 / Previous Record 4.20 set in 2007    

Los Angeles (Downtown): 2013 Record 3.60 / Previous Record 4.08 set in 1953            

Shasta Dam: 2013 Record 16.89 / Previous Record 27.99 set in 1976

At the end of 2013, persistent dry conditions resulted in DWR announcing an initial water allocation of only five percent of SWP water supplies. SWP water makes up a significant part of the water supply portfolio for many water agencies.  How each water agency manages the low allocation will depend on individual circumstances.

“During these especially dry times, public water agencies work hard to ensure adequate water supplies for customers,” added Erlewine. “These efforts include depending heavily on storage, drawing from groundwater basins; but it also means increased conservation measures and restrictions.  The state’s agricultural areas will see major impacts as the lack of water will result in the need to fallow important farmland.”

Cities and counties across the state are beginning to look at more stringent conservation measures and mandates in order to lessen the impacts of what experts are anticipating will be another dry year. Residents throughout the state should be doing what they can to conserve water. 

Recognizing the seriousness of the dry conditions, Governor Jerry Brown recently convened an interagency taskforce to work together to determine if a statewide drought should be declared. This taskforce is also working to strengthen drought preparations and address the impacts of water shortages, especially in areas that are dependent on groundwater supplies that suffer during prolonged dry spells.

Coupled with the record dry spell are environmental regulations that have made water supply management a growing challenge. Water agencies are often required to halt or dramatically slow down deliveries to comply with these regulations.

For example, in late 2012 and early 2013, storms came through that would have replenished South of Delta reservoirs, but because of environmental restrictions, the SWP and federal Central Valley Project were not allowed to divert 800,000 acre feet of water supplies.  That’s the equivalent of the household water needs for more than four million people for a full year. 

Had a tunnel system been in place to move the water, such as that proposed under the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP), water agencies would have had the flexibility to capture this water. Last year, that water would have been sufficient to fill San Luis Reservoir, the system’s largest reservoir south of the Delta. 

The BDCP is being crafted to ensure that Californians have a safe, adequate water supply, while also protecting the Delta environment. The plan includes modernizing the state’s primary water delivery system by routing water underground through twin tunnels to the existing pumping facilities.

Currently, the state’s water infrastructure consists of 100-year old dirt levees that usher water from the Sierra Nevada Mountains through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta); these levees are susceptible to failure in the event of a major earthquake or natural disaster. Such an event could cause salt water to rush into the Delta, contaminating the drinking water for two-thirds of California. 

For more information on the snow survey and current water conditions, please visit www.water.ca.gov. For more information about the BDCP, please visit www.baydeltaconservationplan.com

 

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State & Federal Agencies Release Public Draft of Bay Delta Conservation Plan, Environmental Impact Report/Statement

Monday, 09 December 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 9, 2013

 

State & Federal Agencies Release Public Draft of Bay Delta Conservation Plan, Environmental Impact Report/Statement

120-Day Public Comment Period to Commence on December 13th 

 Sacramento, CAToday, state and federal agencies released the public draft of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP) and the Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS). The release of this public draft marks an important step in the effort to restore the ecosystem of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and secure the water supply for 25 million Californians and millions of acres of farmland. The draft BDCP has been in development for more than seven years and has evolved through extensive scientific research and planning. The release of these documents initiates a public comment period that will commence on Dec. 13th and last for 120 days. Information on how to comment on the BDCP and/or EIR/EIS can be found here. The draft BDCP and EIR/EIS, along with summaries of what has changed in the documents and additional informational materials, can be found here. To find out what other stakeholders are saying about the BDCP, click here.

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State’s Initial Projection Shows Only 5% of State Water Project Water Available for Californians

Wednesday, 20 November 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 20, 2013

 

State’s Initial Projection Shows Only 5% of State Water Project Water Available for Californians
Second Time in History That Such a Low Initial Allocation Has Been Issued

 

Sacramento, CA – On the heels of a very dry year, the California Department of Water Resources announced today that California’s water agencies, those that get water from the State Water Project (SWP), should initially expect only five percent of SWP water supplies. Only one other time in the history of the SWP has the initial allocation been such a small percentage. 

This announcement comes as California faces two major water supply challenges—persistent dry conditions and an antiquated water infrastructure system.

Environmental regulations have also made water supply management a growing challenge. Water agencies are often required to halt or dramatically slow down deliveries to comply with these regulations.

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State Water Contractors Hires Stefanie Morris as General Counsel

Friday, 01 November 2013

For Immediate Release:
November 1, 2013
 

State Water Contractors Hires Stefanie Morris as General Counsel

Sacramento, CA – The State Water Contractors (SWC) has hired Stefanie Morris to serve as the organization’s general counsel, Terry Erlewine, SWC’s General Manager, announced today. 

“We’re pleased to welcome Stefanie Morris to the State Water Contractors as in-house general counsel. Her experience in water law will be a great asset for the State Water Contractors and our member agencies,” said Terry Erlewine. 

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New State Water Contractors Fact Sheet Examines David Sunding, Jeffrey Michael Cost-Benefit Studies

Monday, 26 August 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 26, 2013
New State Water Contractors Fact Sheet Examines David Sunding, Jeffrey Michael Cost-Benefit Studies
Comparison Highlights Differences in Depth, Methods

Sacramento, CA – The State Water Contractors released a fact sheet today comparing two of the studies being referenced to assess the costs and benefits of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP). UC Berkeley’s David Sunding and University of the Pacific’s Jeffrey Michael, have both testified before the legislature and are regularly utilized as sources on this issue, but their findings are drastically different.

The fact sheet released today takes a side-by-side look at the significant differences in depth and methodology between the two studies. Dr. Sunding’s research exceeded all applicable federal guidelines for the economic analysis of a Habitat Conservation Plan. The result was extensive original research including a 244-page report concluding that the BDCP would create and protect more than one million jobs and provide significant net economic benefits to California. Conversely, Dr. Michael analyzed segments of a previous draft study by Dr. Sunding and concluded in a

13-page analysis that the BDCP’s costs exceed likely benefits.

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